Aik Hi Bhool | Markus Guentner - Crystal Castle (Original Mix) | Sw08rd Art Online Fatal Bullet

Jane Austen's Letters Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Jane Austen's Letters Jane Austen's Letters by Jane Austen
2,268 ratings, 4.15 average rating, 85 reviews
Jane Austen's Letters Quotes (showing 1-11 of 11)
“I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters
“To you I shall say, as I have often said before, Do not be in a hurry, the right man will come at last...”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters
“I could not sit seriously down to write a serious Romance under any other motive than to save my life, & if it were indispensable for me to keep it up & never relax into laughing at myself or other people, I am sure I should be hung before I had finished the first chapter. No - I must keep my own style & go on in my own way; and though I may never succeed again in that, I am convinced that I should totally fail in any other.”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters
“I will not say that your mulberry trees are dead; but I am afraid they're not alive. ”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters
“How horrible it is to have so many people killed! And what a blessing that one cares for none of them! ”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters
“If I am a wild Beast I cannot help it. It is not my own fault.”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters
“What should I do with your strong, manly, spirited sketches, full of variety and glow? How could I possibly join them on to the little bit (two inches wide) of ivory on which I work with so fine a brush, as produces little effect after much labour?”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters
“I cannot help thinking that it is more natural to have flowers grow out of the head than fruit.”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters
“Walter Scott has no business to write novels, especially good ones. — It is not fair. — He has fame and profit enough as a poet, and should not be taking the bread out of other people’s mouths. — I do not like him, and do not mean to like Waverley if I can help it — but fear I must.”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters
“Here I am once more in this scene of dissipation and vice, and I begin already to find my morals corrupted."
-- Jane Austen's Letters August 1796”
Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters
“....how good Mrs. West could have written such books and collected so many hard works, with all her family cares, is still more a matter of astonishment! Composition seems to me impossible with a head full of joints of mutton and doses of rhubarb.”
Jane Austen, Letters of Jane Austen; Selected from the Compilation of Her Great Nephew, Edward, Lord Brabourne